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Results for search "Occupational Health".

06 Nov

Does Physical Work Help Protect Brain From Dementia?

Physical activity on the job may be very different than leisure-time movement, new study finds.

Health News Results - 109

Stressed and Distracted, Kids and Their Teachers Say Virtual Learning Isn't Working

For Morgan Compton, 7, who has attended school remotely for nearly a year, the stress of the pandemic manifests itself in meltdowns.

On one particular day, Morgan "threw a fit and decided to go upstairs," said her mother, Tracy Compton. Hearing the sound of his daughter's tears, Compton's husband, John, who also works from home, got involved.

Meltdowns are familiar to any paren...

Pandemic Unemployment Has Taken Its Own Deadly Toll

MONDAY, March 1, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- With U.S. deaths from COVID-19 passing the grim milestone of a half-million, a new study suggests that another 30,000-plus Americans have died due to pandemic-related unemployment.

Using various data sources, researchers estimated that number of deaths between April 2020 and March 2021 could be attributed to pandemic-fueled job ...

Working from Home? Here's How to Preserve Your Posture

If you're working at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, you need to have a work space that's doesn't cause pain or discomfort in your back, neck or legs, a spine specialist says.

"Most couches may not provide the same type of support and contour as an ergonomic office chair, so your back and neck may stay in a fixed, stressed position for a long period of time, creating strain on certain ...

Pandemic Is Adding to Teachers' Stress, and Quit Rates

Stress is the No. 1 reason U.S. teachers left the profession before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new poll reveals.

Nearly 1,000 former public school teachers were polled in December. Three-quarters said their job was often or always stressful during their final year in the classroom.

Stress was nearly twice as common as poor pay as a reason for quitting, according to the resu...

'Night Owls' Perform Worse at Work, Study Finds

"Early to bed, early to rise" may be good advice for your career. New research finds that, compared to night owls, folks with earlier bedtimes perform better at work and are less plagued by disabilities that lead to early retirement.

Overall, "night owls" were twice as likely as "early birds" to underperform at work, the new study found. Folks who stayed up late also ran a heightened risk...

Grumpy? Depressed? Try a More Regular Sleep Schedule

A steady sleep routine may do more than keep you well-rested: New research suggests that the more swings in your slumber schedule, the worse your mood and depression symptoms are likely to be.

Researchers from Michigan Medicine followed the sleep patterns of interns in their first year of residency after medical school. That irregular sleep schedule can increase a person's risk of depress...

COVID & Elevators: A Dangerous Mix, But Here's How to Make It Safer

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- As the new coronavirus vaccine rollout gathers speed, elevators will likely become a flash point for businesses hoping to reopen offices while sticking to social distancing.

And a new computer simulation suggests that the usual "first-come, first-served" elevator routine is neither safe nor practical.

"Now that vaccine...

Livestock Workers at Higher Risk for 'Superbug' Infection

Livestock workers have an elevated risk of getting infected with dangerous, antibiotic-resistant "superbug" bacteria, a new study shows.

Researchers from Michigan State University expected that finding when studying those risks by reviewing 15 years of published literature.

They just didn't expect the risks to be as high as what their research uncovered.

"This is a bit of a...

Could Working Outside Help Prevent Breast Cancer?

The great outdoors can soothe the soul, but new research suggests that working outside might also guard against breast cancer.

The study wasn't designed to say how working outside affects chances of developing breast cancer, but vitamin D exposure may be the driving force, the researchers suggested.

"The main hypothesis is that sun exposure through vitamin D production may decrease ...

Bosses Need Love, Too

Feeling appreciated by their employees is good for bosses and their companies, according to a new study.

It included 79 supervisors who, twice a day for 10 consecutive workdays, recorded how much they felt appreciated by their staff, and how that affected their energy levels, job satisfaction, sense of optimism and life satisfaction.

"On days supervisors felt more appreciated, they ...

Working at Home Brings Its Own Health Perils: Survey

Working from home may take its toll on mental and physical health, but making some tweaks to your workspace and your headspace may help maximize the potential benefits and minimize any downsides, a new survey suggests.

Nearly 65% of people who were working from home due to COVID-19 restrictions reported new physical woes including "tech neck" and lower back pain, and about 74% said they h...

Menopause Can Make Workplace Tougher for Women: Study

Menopause symptoms can interfere with women's jobs, Japanese researchers report.

For the study, the investigators looked at nearly 600 working women, aged 45 to 65, in Japan. Of those, 61% were postmenopausal.

Women with a higher number of menopause symptoms had poorer work performance, according to the authors of the study published online recently in Menopause, journal of...

'A Struggle:' Physical, Mental Ills Can Linger Months After COVID Recovery

Patients who survive severe COVID-19 after being hospitalized are not necessarily home-free upon discharge, new research warns.

After tracking outcomes among 1,250 COVID-19 patients for two months after being released from the hospital, investigators found that nearly 7% ultimately died in the weeks following their release, while 15% ended up being readmitted to the hospital. Many others ...

Could Night Shifts Raise Asthma Risk?

Night-shift workers are about one-third more likely to develop moderate to severe asthma compared to folks working daylight hours, a new study finds.

Researchers in Britain explained that working a night shift can play havoc with the body's internal clock, and has been tied to an increased risk for various metabolic disorders, cardiovascular disease and cancer. So, in the new study, they...

Nearly 74 Million Essential Workers at High Risk for COVID in U.S.

In a graphic illustration of the danger the new coronavirus poses to essential workers in America, a new study shows that as many as 74 million of these workers and their families are at increased risk for COVID-19.

It gets worse: Of that number, up to 61% are at increased risk for severe COVID-19.

"Public policymakers face important decisions about how to balance the economic benef...

Telecommuting Shields Workers From COVID-19: CDC Report

Working from home during the pandemic significantly reduces your risk of catching COVID-19, U.S. health officials say.

The option to work remotely, however, appears to be available mostly to college-educated white employees with health insurance who make $75,000 a year or more, according to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report.

"We have two different kinds of...

Construction Workers at High Risk for COVID

Construction workers have a higher risk of being hospitalized with COVID-19 than other workers, a new study finds.

Using data collected between March and August on hospitalizations in Austin, Texas, researchers found that construction workers were five times more likely than people in other occupations to be hospitalized with COVID-19.

Their greater vulnerability is probably becaus...

How Teachers Can Manage Burnout During the Pandemic

Many teachers are suffering from burnout as they try to cope with teaching during a pandemic, worrying about managing students and dealing with anxiety about their own health.

But Ann Murphy, director of the Northeast and Caribbean Mental Health Technology Transfer Center at Rutgers School of Health Professions in New Jersey, says teachers can manage stress and anxiety during this challen...

NYC Transit Workers Hit Hard by COVID-19: Survey

The COVID-19 pandemic is taking a significant toll on New York City transit workers, who are grappling with illness, anxiety and the loss of colleagues.

About 24% of transit workers who participated in a pilot study led by New York University researchers reported having had COVID-19. About 76% said they knew a colleague who had died of the disease and 90% feared they also would get sick.<...

Me, Me, Me: Narcissists Drawn to Politics, Study Shows

It's all about him. Or her.

New research supports what much of the electorate may already suspect: Many narcissistic people are drawn to politics, and that could put democracy in danger.

As the researchers defined it, narcissism is a combination of selfishness, entitlement and a need for admiration.

"Successful democratic functioning requires trust in institutions...

Many Health Care Workers Who Have Coronavirus Don't Have Symptoms: Study

Four in 10 health care workers who test positive for COVID-19 don't have symptoms, which means they could unknowingly spread the disease to co-workers and patients, researchers say.

For the new study, the research team reviewed 97 studies that included more than 230,000 health care workers in 24 countries. Rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection among the health care workers ranged from 7% ...

Being a Jerk Not a Recipe for Getting Ahead at Work

Being a selfish jerk won't pave a path to success, new research suggests.

The study involved hundreds of participants who completed personality assessments when they were undergraduates or MBA students at three universities.

The researchers checked in with the same people about 14 years later to find out how well they'd done in their careers, and their co-workers were asked ...

Even With PPE, Risk of COVID-19 Still High for Frontline Workers

At the peak of the pandemic in the United States and United Kingdom, frontline health care workers, especially minorities, had much higher risks for COVID-19 than other individuals, a new study finds.

Paramedics, who are often the first to see sick patients, are at far greater risk of testing positive for COVID-19 than others, the researchers said. That's especially true for frontlin...

What Jobs Are Toughest on the Knees?

Joint replacements for knee osteoarthritis are becoming more common, and now researchers have identified jobs that may lead to one.

Based on a review of 71 studies that included nearly one million workers, the riskiest occupations include agriculture, construction, mining, service jobs and housekeeping. And jobs that demand excessive kneeling, squatting, standing, lifting and climbin...

'Aerosol Boxes' Meant to Protect COVID Health Teams Might Harm Them: Study

Aerosol boxes meant to protect health care workers when they intubate COVID-19 patients may actually increase their exposure to airborne virus particles, an Australian study warns.

Intubation is done when patients are placed on a ventilator.

Aerosol boxes have been touted as a quick, simple way to protect workers, but their effectiveness and safety were never clinically test...

Coronavirus Fears Kept Many Essential Workers at Home in April: Study

Many more American workers caring for children, the sick or aged, as well as bus drivers, subway workers and those involved in food production took time off work in April -- probably due to fears of contracting COVID-19, a new government report finds.

In an analysis of federal employment data on work absenteeism from October 2019 until the end of April 2020, researchers found that abs...

COVID Threatens the 3 out of 4 Americans Who Can't Work From Home

Working at home during a pandemic isn't an option for about three-quarters of U.S. workers, putting them at increased risk of infection, a new study finds.

Those 108 million workers tend to be among the lowest paid and are more likely to face pandemic-related job disruptions, including layoffs, furloughs or reduced hours.

"This pandemic has really exacerbated existing vulner...

Working From Home?  Posture, Ergonomics Can Make It Safe

If you're working from home because of the coronavirus pandemic and expect to keep doing so, you need to be sure your work station is set up properly, an orthopedic specialist says.

You also need to take regular breaks to move around, according to Terrence McGee, a physical therapist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.

In an office, many people have ...

How to Get Better Sleep While Working at Home

For many, work-at-home orders aimed at fighting the COVID-19 pandemic have had an unintended side effect: sleep loss.

"We've seen a significant increase in reports of stress-related insomnia in recent months," said Julio Fernandez-Mendoza of the Penn State Health Sleep Research and Treatment Center in Hummelstown, Penn.

Stress and worry about the pandemic is one reason and ...

Getting Back to Work Safely After Lockdown

With businesses beginning to reopen, the National Safety Council (NSC) has tips for doing it right.

"We hope these universal actions, the detailed playbooks and the recommendations within them will help employers safely navigate reopening operations while prioritizing employees' rights to safe work environments," said Lorraine Martin, NSC president and CEO.

Here are top tip...

Physical Jobs Tied to More Sick Leave, Earlier Retirement

People with physically demanding jobs take more sick leave. They also have higher unemployment rates and shorter work lives, a new Danish study finds.

"This study showed that high physical work demands are a marked risk factor for a shortened expected working life and increased years of sickness absence and unemployment," study co-author Lars Andersen and colleagues wrote. Andersen is...

Mental Health is Big Issue For Police Officers  Around The World: Study

Mental health problems and substance abuse are common among cops, and more needs to be done to address those issues, researchers say.

Previous studies have suggested that first responders have a higher risk of mental health issues than the general public, but it wasn't clear how police officers were affected.

To learn more, researchers reviewed 67 studies that included more ...

As Americans Return to Work, How Will COVID Change the Workplace?

TUESDAY, May 19, 2020 (HealthDay News) --White-collar employees heading back to the office after months of sheltering at home are likely to find a drastically changed workplace in the wake of COVID-19, experts say.

Until now, offices have been designed primarily around business needs, with some nods toward fire safety, said Nellie Brown, director of workplace health and safety program...

Pandemic Is Putting Cutting-Edge Cancer Research on Hold: Survey

COVID-19 has at least temporarily shut down more than half of cancer research, according to an American Cancer Society (ACS) survey.

The survey, conducted in early April, was completed by close to 500 cancer researchers who have received ACS funding. It revealed that:

  • 54% were working from home.
  • 32% were working both at home and in their lab.
  • ...

Nervous About Returning to Work? Take Precautions Against Coronavirus

As coronavirus pandemic restrictions are lifted, many Americans will face physical and mental health challenges -- including fear and anxiety -- as they return to work.

"Uncertainty and unpredictability can really create an unhealthy amount of fear and stress, especially when it's sustained over such a long period of time," said Dr. K. Luan Phan, head of psychiatry and behavioral heal...

Layoffs and Losses: COVID-19 Leaves U.S. Hospitals in Financial Crisis

The COVID-19 pandemic has done untold economic damage in the United States, with businesses shuttering and people self-isolating at home to try to slow the spread of the highly contagious coronavirus.

You might think hospitals and health care systems would be immune to this wave of financial ruin, since there's no industry more crucial to America's fight against the pandemic.

<...

Injuries a Drain on Employee Productivity

Injuries in the United States take a huge toll on the workplace, new research shows.

For the study, researchers analyzed millions of workplace health insurance claims among adults aged 18 to 64 between 2014 and 2015, with a specific focus on non-fatal injuries treated in emergency departments.

The injuries examined in the study included burns, poisonings, gunshot wounds, fal...

Thousands of Health Care Workers Lack Insurance If COVID-19 Strikes: Study

The coronavirus pandemic has put a spotlight on the sacrifices of America's health care workers, yet many of them live in poverty and can't afford health insurance.

A new study finds that more than 600,000 health care workers are poor and potentially without insurance or paid sick leave, and up to 4 million have health problems that put them at risk of dying from COVID-19.

Women Are Much Safer Drivers Than Men, British Study Finds

If more women were hired for trucking jobs, the roads would be a lot safer, British researchers suggest.

That's because men, who hold most driving jobs, are more likely to drive dangerously. This puts other road users at risk, said lead researcher Rachel Aldred. She's a reader in transport at the University of Westminster in London.

"Greater gender equity would have a posi...

ER Workers' Stress May Affect Patient Care: Study

The COVID-19 pandemic has added to already high stress levels in emergency rooms, a social psychologist says.

"ER providers are on the front line of this pandemic, and stress, anxiety and anger are increasing," said Linda Isbell, a professor of psychology at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

"As we all face anxiety about the fallout of this pandemic, anger about a healt...

Pain Is a Growing Threat to the Nation's Surgeons, New Research Reveals

Many surgeons have neck and back pain after performing operations, a small new study finds.

It included 53 surgeons (34 men and 19 women) who did 116 operations at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix. They wore devices that measured neck, back and arm posture during surgery, and were asked about pain and fatigue levels before and after.

Pain increased after surgery in every body area...

Being Chained to Your Desk Might Harm Your Thyroid

Could long hours at the office put you at risk for hypothyroidism?

New research suggests it's possible: Hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid) was more than twice as common in adults who worked 53 to 83 hours a week as in those who worked 36 to 42 hours a week (3.5% vs. 1.4%).

Hypothyroidism can cause tiredness, depression, feeling cold and weight gain, and it's als...

Construction Industry Respirator Masks Can Be Used by Health Care Workers: Study

As the coronavirus pandemic stresses the U.S. health care system, personal protective equipment -- including high-tech masks -- are in desperately short supply.

But a new study suggests an innovative solution: Reusable respirators typically used by construction or factory workers may be a viable alternative to disposable N95 respirators used by health care personnel.

The r...

'Eye of the Storm:' U.S. Nurses Already Facing Extreme Stress Over Coronavirus

"I have worked the last four days, and I have cried every day."

Eileen McStay, a registered nurse at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, is on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, and it is mentally and emotionally wearing her and her colleagues down.

McStay works on a hospital floor filled with nothing but lonely, scared coronavirus patients, some of whom are fi...

How Do Your Work Relationships Affect Burnout?

Being recognized for your efforts at work could reduce your risk of burnout, new research suggests.

Emotional exhaustion, decreased productivity and depersonalization (loss of identity) are characteristics of burnout, a widespread problem that takes a significant toll on workers and employers, the researchers said.

For the study, they asked 328 employees to complete a questi...

One in 10 Workers Could Be Exposed to Coronavirus Weekly at Work

Millions of workers who constantly interact with the public are exposed to viruses and bacteria on a weekly basis, and so they face a greater risk of falling ill with coronavirus, a new analysis reveals.

Due to the nature of their jobs, about 1 in 10 U.S. workers (14.4 million) face exposure to infections weekly, while nearly 2 of 10 (26.7 million) are exposed at least once a month in...

12 Weeks of Paid Maternity Leave Benefits Everyone: Study

The argument against paid maternity leave in the United States often focuses on the cost, but a new study suggests that more paid leave would not only be beneficial for families, but also for society.

In the study, researchers found that new parents with paid medical leave of 12 weeks or more were more likely to be in better mental and physical shape than those who received less paid ...

Young Breast Cancer Patients Struggle Financially, Even When Insured

Financial struggles are common among young breast cancer patients in the United States, even if they have steady jobs that provide health insurance, new research shows.

The study included 830 women, aged 18 to 39, in California, Florida, Georgia and North Carolina who were diagnosed with breast cancer between January 2013 and December 2014.

Nearly half (47%) of the women...

Some U.S. Workers Are Bringing Toxins Home to Their Kids

People who work with potentially dangerous chemicals or hazardous metals such as lead may unwittingly bring those toxic substances home, a new review says.

In the home, these substances put family members, especially children, at risk of serious illness.

While precautions may be taken in the workplace to protect workers, these take-home exposures may fall into a regulatory bli...

Workers With Cluster Headaches Take Twice as Many Sick Days

People afflicted with cluster headaches miss work twice as often as colleagues without the debilitating headaches, a new study finds.

Cluster headaches are extremely painful headaches that last from 15 minutes to three hours, for many days, or even weeks, in a row. They're more common in men.

For the study, Swedish researchers compared more than 3,200 working-age people who ...

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