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Results for search "Environment".

24 Mar

Listening To The Sounds of Nature Has Major Health Benefits, Study Finds.

The sound of birds singing and rain falling can boost your health and lower stress, researchers say.

29 Dec

Is Your Favorite Seafood Contaminated With Microplastics?

These 3 seafood species have the highest levels of plastic particles, researchers say.

Health News Results - 324

Kids in Marching Bands Under Threat From Heat Illness

It's not just athletes on the field who suffer when outdoor temperatures get too high. Members of college and high school marching bands are at increased risk of heat-related illness, too, researchers warn.

"They go out there, and they often wear these really heavy wool uniforms," said lead author Andrew Grundstein of the University of Georgia. "They practice many times for hours and hour...

9/11 First Responders Face Higher Cancer Risk 20 Years Later

Twenty years on, responders to the World Trade Center attacks in New York City are showing increased risks of certain cancers, two new studies confirm.

Researchers found higher-than-average rates of prostate cancer among firefighters, medics and other workers who toiled at the disaster site on and after Sept. 11, 2001.

And compared with firefighters from other major U.S. cities...

Is Your Workplace an Asthma Trigger?

Workers, take heed: Your place of work can help bring on or exacerbate asthma, a new study suggests.

Common workplace triggers include poor ventilation and moldy air conditioning systems, cleaning products and even the toner used in printers, the researchers said. Employees with asthma caused by the office environment often quit, the researchers said, especially if employers don't do anyt...

Wildfires Cause More Than 33,000 Deaths Globally Each Year

Wildfires are killing people around the world -- even those with limited exposure to wildfire-related pollution, an international team of researchers reports.

The new research revealed that short-term exposure to wildfire-related fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the air is i...

Could Traffic Noise Raise Your Odds for Dementia?

It's more than just an annoyance: Long-term exposure to traffic and train noise may increase the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, Danish researchers report.

The study authors said that more than 1,200 of Denmark's nearly 8,500 cases of dementia in 2017 may have resulted from exposure to noise, which means that reducing traffic noise might help prevent the thinking, memory and beh...

More Than 230 Medical Journals Issue Joint Statement on Health Dangers of Global Warming

An editorial written jointly by the editors of more than 230 medical journals worldwide has a grim warning for humanity: Climate change is making people sick -- and it's going to get worse.

As reported by CNN, the same global warming that's causing extreme weather events has had a number of negative impacts on human health during the past two decades, the journal editors said. ...

Global Warming Could Worsen COPD Symptoms

Hotter weather driven by climate change is bad news for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study warns.

Researchers say warming trends could worsen COPD symptoms, such as shortness of breath, wheezing or coughing. Millions of people have COPD, a combination of emphysema and chronic bronchitis that is often tied to smoking.

"The climate emergency is pr...

Toxic Leaded Gasoline Is Finished Globally

Algeria recently became the last country in the world to halt sales of highly toxic leaded gasoline, the U.N. Environment Agency (UNEP) said Monday.

The agency said that marked the "official end" of the use of the fuel that's been linked to a wide range of human health problems, the Associated Press reported.

"The successful enforcement of the ban on leaded petrol is a huge...

Greener Neighborhoods Bring Healthier Hearts, Study Shows

The greener your neighborhood, the lower your risk of heart disease.

That's the takeaway from a new study, which reported that adding to a neighborhood's green space can have a big payoff for public health.

"For the cost of one emergency room visit for a heart attack, trees could be planted in a neighborhood with 100 residents and potentially prevent ten heart diseases," said study ...

How Your Medicines Make Their Way Into Rivers, Lakes and Bays

Leaky sewer pipes are to blame for large amounts of human medicines getting into rivers, lakes and other bodies of water, a new study reveals.

Researchers found that tens of thousands of doses of drugs get into Chesapeake Bay in Maryland every year due to seeping sewer pipes.

"Pharmaceuticals enter freshwaters through multiple pathways, including effluent from wastewater treatment a...

Common Pesticide to Be Banned Over Links to  Problems in Children

The Biden Administration said Wednesday that a widely used pesticide will be banned because it's been linked to neurological damage in children.

The new rule to block the use of chlorpyrifos on food will take effect in six months, the Environmental Protection Agency said.

"Today [the] EPA is taking an overdue step to protect public health," EPA head Michael Regan said in an agency ...

Kids Who Grew Up With Smokers Have Higher Odds for Rheumatoid Arthritis

While breathing in secondhand smoke is known to harm kids' lungs, new research suggests that children whose parents smoked are also more prone to developing rheumatoid arthritis later in life.

"Our findings give more depth and gravity to the negative health consequences of smoking in relation to [rheumatoid arthritis], one of the most common autoimmune diseases," said lead author Dr. Kazu...

Double Trouble: Wildfires Can Raise COVID Risks

The wildfire smoke now smothering wide portions of the United States isn't just stinging eyes and tightening chests -- it also might be contributing to the current surge of severe COVID-19 cases.

Data from three Western states subject to frequent wildfires shows that COVID-19 cases and deaths increase with the amount of smoke pollution in the air, according to a new study.

As wildfi...

Climate Change Worsens Wildfires, Bringing Poorer Health to All

Smoke from wildfires burning along the West Coast is choking the entire United States, reminding everyone of the hazards of climate change.

But that haze isn't just stinging your eyes and choking your breath -- it poses a direct threat to your health, experts say.

Wildfire smoke has been shown to increase risk of heart attacks and strokes, as well as lung ailments like asthma, Ameri...

Dirty Air, Higher Dementia Risk?

It's long been know that polluted can damage the heart and lungs, but new research finds that it's bad for your brain, too.

A long-term study by a Seattle team linked exposure to higher levels of fine particulate air pollution to an increased risk of dementia.

"We found that an increase of 1 microgram per cubic meter of exposure corresponded to a 16% greater hazard of all-cause dem...

Smoggy Air Might Help Spur Sinusitis

Air pollution could cause sinus misery, new research suggests.

Specifically, tiny particulate air pollution (known as PM2.5) could contribute to chronic rhinosinusitis, a condition in which the sinuses get infected or irritated, become swollen, are severely congested and secrete mucus into the throat for 12 weeks or more.

"To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that lon...

Take This Refresher on Skin Safety in Summer Sun

Sun protection is essential as you enjoy the outdoors this summer, a skin expert stresses.

"Skin cancer is the most common cancer in humans so it's important that we do what we can to protect ourselves," Dr. Ida Orengo, a professor of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, said in a school news release.

Here are some of her tips:

  • Wear a sunscreen with SPF ...

Lockdowns Cut Air Pollution, But Poorer Neighborhoods Benefited Less

If you thought the air was cleaner at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, you weren't imagining it. But clean skies were less evident in poorer areas of the United States, a new study finds.

COVID-19 pandemic-related lockdowns reduced overall levels of nitrogen dioxide air pollution in many U.S. cities. However, levels remained higher in poorer, minority neighborhoods than in richer, whi...

Double Trouble: Wildfire Smoke Could Boost Odds for COVID's Spread

Breathing in smoke from wildfires may significantly increase the spread of COVID-19, researchers say.

The warning, from a new study of links between smoke-caused air pollution and SARS-CoV-2 infections, comes as firefighters battle 80 large wildfires in the western United States. The largest -- 300 miles south of Portland, Ore. -- covers over 500 square miles.

For this study, resear...

Extreme Heat Hits Poorer Neighborhoods Harder

Extreme heat strikes poor and minority neighborhoods in U.S. cities harder than those that are wealthier and mainly white, a new study finds.

"The distribution of excess urban heat varies within cities, and as a result, communities do not share a city's extreme heat burden equally," said study co-author Jennifer Burney. She's chair of global climate policy and research at the University o...

Growing Up in Lead-Contaminated Area Might Alter Personality: Study

Can childhood lead exposure affect personality into adulthood?

Yes, a big multi-decade study suggests.

The finding stems from an analysis of data on atmospheric lead levels across the United States and 37 European nations since 1960. Lead levels were stacked up against responses to a personality survey of roughly 1.5 million men and women.

The result: Americans raised in areas...

Pesticide Harmed Children's Brains: Lawsuits

Lawsuits claiming that the widely used bug killer chlorpyrifos caused brain damage in children were filed Monday in California.

Past research has shown that the pesticide harms the brains of fetuses and children, the Associated Press reported.

Chlorpyrifos is approved for use on more than 80 crops, but was banned for household use in 2001. The U.S. Environmental Protection ...

Climate Change Already Causes 5 Million Extra Deaths Per Year

Climate change has already become deadly enough to cause 5 million extra deaths worldwide each year, researchers report.

"This is the first study to get a global overview of mortality due to non-optimal temperature conditions between 2000 and 2019, the hottest period since the pre-industrial era," said study co-leader Yuming Guo, a professor at Monash University in Australia.

The fi...

How Much Do Trees Lower Urban Temperatures?

Could trees be the key to a cool summer in the city?

Yes, claims new research that calculated just how much greenery can bring temperatures down.

"We've long known that the shade of trees and buildings can provide cooling," said study co-author Jean-Michel Guldmann. He is a professor emeritus of city and regional planning at Ohio State University, in Columbus.

"But now we can...

Summer Playgrounds Come With Fun and Hazards

As the pandemic eases and children flock to playgrounds this summer, parents need to make sure their kids are safe, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) says.

"After a challenging school year and months of being socially distanced and kept apart from their friends, children are eager to get outside and play," said AAOS spokesperson Dr. Rachel Goldstein. She is a pediatric o...

Another Pollen Misery: It Might Help Transmit COVID-19

Pollen is tough enough for allergy sufferers, but a new study suggests it also helps spread the new coronavirus and other airborne germs.

Researchers had noticed a connection between COVID-19 infection rates and pollen concentrations on the National Allergy Map of the United States.

That led them to create a computer model of all the pollen-producing parts of a willow tree. They the...

Leaded Gas, Banned Decades Ago, Might Still Harm People Today

The good news: Levels of lead in the air that Londoners breathe are far lower today than they were in the 1980s, when leaded gas was an automotive staple.

The bad news: Decades-old lead particles still pollute the city's air, a stubborn and potentially hazardous leftover of a now banned product. The findings might have implications for the health of city dwellers globally.

In the ...

5 Tests You Should Not Order for a Child With Autism

A leading medical group is offering testing guidelines for children with autistic behaviors.

The American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Environmental Health emphasized that certain measurements to test for exposure to chemicals are not helpful to guide treatment. The council pointed out that just because a chemical is found in the body doesn't mean it will cause harm.

The counc...

Mold a Big Threat to People With COPD

Exposure to mold both in and out of the home may worsen breathlessness and other symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), new research suggests.

More than 16 million Americans have COPD, according to the American Lung Association. COPD is an umbrella term for chronic lung diseases such as bronchitis and emphysema, which literally take your breath away. COPD flares can be...

Even Good Weather Didn't Lift Lockdown Blues: Study

In normal times, a sunny day can lift your mood while a stormy one can darken it, but new British research shows that weather had little effect on people's spirits during the pandemic.

"We know that lockdown restrictions, and the resulting impact on social life and the economy, are linked to at least two major negative public health consequences -- a reduction in physical exercise, both i...

Dirty Air in Pregnancy Might Raise Baby's Obesity Risk

Children may have an increased risk of obesity if their mothers were exposed to high levels of air pollution during pregnancy, researchers say.

In a new study, 123 Hispanic mother-infant pairs were enrolled in an ongoing trial in the Los Angeles region. Before pregnancy, about one-third of the mothers were normal weight, one-third were overweight and one-third were obese.

The resear...

Global Warming to Blame for 1 in 3 Heat-Related Deaths Worldwide

Human-caused global warming is responsible for more than one-third of heat-related deaths worldwide, but the proportion is much higher in certain countries, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data gathered between 1991 and 2018 from 732 locations in 43 countries. They concluded that 37% of all heat-related deaths in recent summer periods were attributable to the warming of the planet...

Smog Might Damage Your Sense of Smell

Breathing in tiny particles of air pollution over a long period of time may put your sense of smell at risk, a new study suggests.

Researchers found the risk for loss of smell - a condition called anosmia - was nearly doubled among people with lengthy exposure to this type of air pollution, known as particulate matter.

"It's curious that the entire group who had lost th...

Amazon Tribe Could Hold Key to Health of Aging Brains

A native South American population that lives a pre-industrial lifestyle may have a slower rate of brain aging than the typical Westerner, a new study finds.

The study focused on the Tsimane population, whose roughly 16,000 members dwell in a remote part of the Bolivian Amazon. They live by farming, hunting, gathering and fishing - a lifestyle devoid of processed food, couch time and stre...

Global Warming Could Bring More Stillbirths, Study Warns

Rising temperatures caused by climate change could trigger a worldwide increase in stillbirths, researchers warn.

The team at the University of Queensland in Australia analyzed 12 studies on the subject. They found that exposure to extremely high temperatures throughout pregnancy appeared to increase risk of stillbirth, particularly late in pregnancy.

"Overall, risk of stillbirth ap...

City Parks: Safe Havens That Don't Raise COVID Infection Risks

Sitting or strolling in a park offered precious respite for many Americans during the pandemic, and new research shows city parks don't fuel the spread of COVID-19.

Researchers looked at how people used parks in Philadelphia and New York City during the pandemic and found no connection between being in a park and catching COVID-19.

"Despite early speculation that parks could become...

Is Your Family 'CO Safe' When Big Storms Hit?

If you live in the path of hurricanes , the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is urging you to be prepared.

Deaths from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, fires and electric shock are common during severe weather events, according to the CPSC.

Hurricane season in North America runs from June 1 through Nov. 30. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has ...

Two Out of Three California Prison Inmates Said Yes to COVID Vaccine

Sixty-seven percent of inmates in California prisons who were offered a COVID-19 vaccine have accepted at least one dose, a Stanford University study found.

"This is one of the largest state prison systems in the country, and if it can achieve high vaccination coverage among its incarcerated population, then the federal and other state prisons systems can and should do the same for the mo...

Meat Production Is Dirtying the Air You Breathe

Steaks and burgers could be killing thousands of Americans each year, but in a way most people wouldn't expect -- via air pollution.

That's the conclusion of a new study estimating that airborne particles generated by food production kill nearly 16,000 Americans each year. Pollution related to animal products -- most notably beef -- accounts for 80% of those deaths.

"What we eat aff...

Asthma Attacks Plummeted During Pandemic

Call it a silver lining of the pandemic: Asthma attacks fell sharply among Black and Hispanic Americans in the months after the coronavirus first surfaced.

The study included nearly 1,200 participants who provided information about their asthma through monthly online, phone or mail questionnaires for 15 months between the first half of 2019 and first half of 2020.

The researchers f...

Air Pollution Can Harm Kids' Hearts for a Lifetime

Air pollution isn't hard on the hearts of adults only, suggests a new analysis that found it can raise blood pressure in kids as young as 5.

Children experienced increases in blood pressure if they had short-term exposure to air polluted with coarser particles or long-term exposure to finer airborne particles, and that also happened with long-term exposure to nitrogen dioxide, an air poll...

Race, Neighborhood Affects How Long You'll Live After Heart Attack

The risk of dying within five years of a heart attack is notably higher among poor Americans than their wealthier peers, but race also plays a role, a new study reveals.

While Black residents of poor neighborhoods appear to face a higher risk of death than their counterparts in wealthier ZIP codes, poor Black patients are also more likely to die after a heart attack than poor white patien...

Wildfires Are Changing the Seasonal Air Quality of the U.S. West

Increasing numbers of wildfires are making poor air quality more common throughout the Western United States, according to a new study.

The findings suggest that many cities may soon have trouble meeting air quality standards, said lead author Kai Wilmot, a doctoral student in atmospheric sciences at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

Wilmot's team examined Western air qualit...

Heat Waves Topping 132 Degrees F Likely in Middle East Without Action on Climate Change

The Middle East and North Africa are already among the hottest spots on the planet, but new research warns that if nothing is done to slow climate change there will be life-threatening heat waves with temperatures of 132 Fahrenheit or higher in those regions.

"Our results for a business-as-usual pathway indicate that, especially in the second half of this century, unprecedented super- an...

Breathing Dirty Air Could Raise a Child's Risk for Adult Mental Illness

Kids exposed to air pollution may be at risk for mental illness in early adulthood, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that young adults in Britain who were exposed to higher levels of traffic-related air pollutants during their childhood and teen years were prone to develop symptoms of mental illness later. Nitrogen oxides were a particular problem, the study authors reported.

One Reason It's Hotter in Poorer Neighborhoods: Fewer Trees

Poor neighborhoods in the United States have fewer trees and are hotter than richer neighborhoods, new research shows.

In the study, the researchers assessed tree cover in the 100 largest urban areas of the country.

In nine out of 10 communities, there was less tree cover in low-income areas than in high-income areas. On average, low-income neighborhoods had about 15% less tree cove...

No Genetic Damage to Kids of Those Exposed to Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster: Study

There's no evidence of genetic damage in the children of parents who were exposed to radiation from the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster in Ukraine, researchers say.

Several previous studies have examined the risks across generations of radiation exposure from events such as this, but have yielded inconclusive results.

In this study, the investigators analyzed the genomes...

Don't Linger: 'Aerosolized Droplets' Hang in the Air After Toilet Flush

If you're in a public restroom, you may not want to hang around too long, because lots of airborne pathogens are hanging around, too.

Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's College of Engineering and Computer Science conducted flush tests in a public restroom with both a toilet and a urinal.

"After about three hours of tests involving more than 100 flushes, we found a substa...

Wildfire Smoke Can Trigger Eczema, Study Finds

When wildfires choked the air and turned the skies orange throughout the American West in recent years, they caused a variety of health problems from coughs and runny noses to life-threatening heart attacks and strokes.

But eczema and other skin issues were a result of the wildfires, too, according to researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and the University ...

Eviction Bans Helped Stop COVID's Spread in Cities: Study

Eviction bans during the COVID-19 pandemic reduced infection rates not only in people who avoided displacement but also in their communities, according to a new study.

"When it comes to a transmissible disease like COVID-19, no neighborhood is entirely isolated," said study author Alison Hill, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore.

I...

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